storytelling


September 11 | StoryCorps
I know I’m late with the 9/11 stuff but so what. I’ve mentioned StoryCorps before but I recently found out that they are working in partnership with the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, the Families of September 11 and 9/11 Forward, in Baldwin, NY to record stories from the families and friends of 9/11 victims. This is what memorials should be about: the individuals involved not the flags and speeches. If you can, listen to a few of the stories and remember. Have tissues handy – trust me.

If you can, give a little to StoryCorps – it’s a great organization.

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NPR : StoryCorps: ‘Listening Is an Act of Love’

Every once in a while I listen to NPR in the morning. If I’m lucky, I get to here a recording from the StoryCorps, an independent project recording stories/oral histories around the country. I truly wish my parents could have participated since they both had stories that were both individual and yet universal.
I believe it’s crucial that we tell the next generation our stories and those of the past generations. It’s through stories that people are truly remembered – videos and photographs are not enough.

“By listening closely to one another, we can help illuminate the true character of this nation—reminding us all just how precious each day can be and how truly great it is to be alive.”
-Dave Isay, Founder, StoryCorps

You can listen to the StoryCorps podcast through iTunes or listen to storys through the StoryCorps website and blog.

Here is a spot that ABC did about Dave Isay, the founder of StoryCorps. He wrote/compiled the book, Listening is an Act of Love, sited above:

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Arts & Living: Hogwarts Hub – The source for all things ‘Harry Potter.’ (washingtonpost.com)

Yes, I’m one of those people. What can I say, it’s a good yarn and I want to know the end. I reserved a copy at Borders but while I was at Target this morning, there it was for $17.88 and no lines, either.

I’m already a third of the way through (it’s a quick read) and I think I will probably finish it this weekend. Don’t tell me the ending!

I am amazed that this was the front story of the Washington Post this morning.

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Laurie Lindeen Petal Pusher

I finished reading the book on Friday. I tried to read it slowly to really savor it but once I hit Part 2 (about 1/3 of the way into the book) I couldn’t put it down and finished it that day. I highly recommend the book to anyone but I think that women who grew up about the same time (born 1959-1966) will truly appreciate it. Lindeen deals with so many issues (personal confusion, parental divorce, chronic illness, love and music) in a wonderfully truthful and humorous manner. She alternates between self-deprecation and self-appreciation very well and seems like a person who would be great to know over the years. The book is very personal (sometimes in a truly graphic manner) but there is a sense of privacy – you know that a line has been drawn and she’s only going to tell so much. I like that. She completely de-glamorizes the music industry (writing, practicing, touring and publishing) and yet still loves music.

I hope she has another book inside her. I suspect that since she’s so great with her memoir, she would be great at fiction. I can just imagine the stories she could tell.

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Portraiture That Paints Engaging Images – washingtonpost.com

Here is the third exhibition to open at the National Portrait Gallery in recent months.

This one is the second installment of the Portraiture Now exhibition space that focuses on contemporary portraiture and loaned art. To quote from the article:

Known primarily as a history museum — where the selection of pictures on the wall is based more on the sitter’s accomplishments than on the artist’s message or merits — the National Portrait Gallery has, since its reopening last summer, devoted a small corner of the building to just the opposite. “Framing Memory,” the second installment in its long-overdue “Portraiture Now” series, presents five contemporary artists, each given a small room (and in one case, a hallway) devoted to work whose engagement with portraiture is less didactic and more lively than we have come to expect from the museum.

It’s an interesting show. I had my doubts while prepping for it but you really have to see the pieces in person to truly appreciate them. I really love the quilts of Faith Ringgold but I’ve been familiar with her work for years. I think what initially put me off was the color of the rooms – very intense, almost fluorescent, greens and oranges. It’s hard to work in rooms painted entirely in these colors, especially on the eyes. However, once the artwork was hung, I understood the choice. The color does draw in the visitors, too.

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This American Life

What is This American Life? I think it’s small slices of Americana given through storytelling. It’s like sitting around and listening to stories from the relatives who have the best stories and great memories.

My niece Sarah introduced me to this radio broadcast. I subscribe to it as a podcast through iTunes. This way I’m not tied to a radio broadcast time and I can stop and start it as needed.

I wish my dad could have heard this program. He would have liked it. He was a great storyteller. So was my mom. I miss hearing their stories told by them. Sometimes I tell them to myself but it’s not the same. I wish I could have captured some of their stories on tape.

I recommend this show not only for the great stories but to serve as an inspiration to ask your family to tell their stories.

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